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Archive for the ‘‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’’ Category

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written by Angelic on August 16, 2013

Until now, Rooney Mara’s on-screen presence could almost always have been described as steely, thanks to tough turns in The Social Network, Side Effects, and, of course, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, the movie that rocketed her to the A-list and netted her an Oscar nod. But that’s all changing with the indie Western Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, which allows Mara to bare a bit of her soul as young mother Ruth, one half of an outlaw couple in 1970s Texas. Ruth’s husband, Bob (Casey Affleck)—the Clyde to her Bonnie—takes the fall for her cop shooting, only to spring from the joint and fight to reunite with his family.

The tender, morally complex role is refreshingly new territory for Mara, whose subtly heartbreaking performance begs the question: Is this the real Rooney? Famously cagey about her personal life, the raven-haired 28-year-old is an enigma among starlets, and when she sat down with DETAILS, she faithfully maintained much of her trademark mystique. But she did share her thoughts on the unique playlists she creates for her roles, the Kenyan charity she started when she was 21, working with Anna Wintour, and how, in the end, none of us ever truly knows the “real” anyone.

DETAILS: Your role in Ain’t Them Bodies Saints allows for a lot of the tough resolve viewers have come to expect from you, but it also features more vulnerability than we’ve seen you express before, and Spike Jonze’s Her (slated for release in January) seems like it might do that as well. Is that a part of yourself you want viewers to see more of?

ROONEY MARA: I never think of it like, “What do I want people to see?” Certainly, the character does have a lot more vulnerability. I don’t know, I think that’s just where I was when I chose those roles. Maybe I was feeling more vulnerable, and that’s what I responded to.

DETAILS: What drew you most to this particular material?

ROONEY MARA: [Director] David Lowery just has a really special, unique voice, and the script was so beautifully written. In the first draft that I read, Ruth was actually not that well developed, but I could still see all the potential there. And her relationship with Bob I found to be beautiful and interesting, and I also really loved the love story between her and her child. I read a lot of scripts where it’s just, “the mom.” I found the way that she was a mother and her relationship with her child to be very different. It was much more complicated than simply, “the protective mother.”

DETAILS: Ain’t Them Bodies Saints has been compared to the work of Terrence Malick, and you’ve recently worked on an upcoming project with him. Do you find a lot of similarities between David and Terrence as directors?

ROONEY MARA: People make that comparison a lot. Their directing styles could not be more different, but I would say that the similarities between them are that they’re both very romantic, and they both see the world in a sort of poetic way.

DETAILS: I was told that your charity, the Uweza Foundation, which supports families in Kenyan slums, was something you first got rolling when you were only 21. If you weren’t an actress, do you think you’d be doing more of that kind of work?

ROONEY MARA: I can’t imagine my life without having some sort of creative outlet like [acting]. But what I do for Uweza and for Oxfam America is what grounds me.

DETAILS: David reportedly sent you a number of songs to help you get into the character of Ruth—songs by artists like Joanna Newsom that helped to inspire the movie. Did you like his playlist? Was it helpful in building the character?

ROONEY MARA: I liked them, but…[Laughs]…I had my own songs that made me feel like the character, so I appreciated his songs, and I listened to them, but then I just, kind of…never listened to them again.

DETAILS: What were your songs?

ROONEY MARA: God, I don’t know, I had such a long playlist that I would listen to. There was a lot of Loretta Lynn on there, and a lot of sad songs. I’m constantly listening to music when I’m working, and I have different playlists for each character.

DETAILS: What was on your playlist for [Dragon Tattoo's] Lisbeth Salander?

ROONEY MARA: There was a lot of angry music, like Nico Vega, and a lot of stuff that [director] David [Fincher] and Trish Summerville, the costume designer, had sent me, like the Karen O cover [of "Immigrant Song"] was on there.

DETAILS: In the midst of the release of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, you were also seemingly being groomed as the unofficial new face of Vogue. You’ve been on two covers now, as well as the cover of the magazine’s latest book, The Editor’s Eye. Who would you say was the more intimidating woman: Anna Wintour or your character Lisbeth?

ROONEY MARA: Lisbeth is much more intimidating. Anna’s a wonderfully intelligent, wildly successful woman. A powerful woman. I guess I can see why she’s intimidating to people, but I think people view that differently than they view men in a position of that kind of power.

DETAILS: Do you feel like people view you as intimidating?

ROONEY MARA: I don’t know, do they?

DETAILS: I think you’re generally perceived as having a fairly intimidating persona.

ROONEY MARA: That’s okay. [Laughs]

DETAILS: There’s a moment in Ain’t Them Bodies Saints in which Casey Affleck’s character says, “People don’t know things the way that they think they know them.” In your experience, is there something the public, or maybe even your peers, may seem to think that they know about you that’s not accurate?

ROONEY MARA: Probably most everything the general public thinks they know about me is not accurate. There are very few people that you truly know in your life. It’s hard to really know someone. People are very complicated. I think we try to simplify people and put them in little categories of being this person, or that person, and it’s just simply not true. I’m sure that most people who don’t know me, probably most of the things they think about me aren’t true. And the same goes for me, with other people that I don’t know. I probably don’t really know anything about them.

Source: Details




written by Grace on August 14, 2013

I’ve added new high quality event photos of Rooney Mara and director David Lowery attend a screening of IFC Films’ “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” presented by Downtown Calvin Klein with The Cinema Society on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013, in New York.



written by Angelic on June 16, 2013

I’ve added new high quality event photos of Rooney Mara arrives at the 2013 Los Angeles Film Festival – ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’ Premiere held at Regal Cinemas L.A. Live on June 15, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. More Q&A session photos have been added as well :)

Arriving

Inside



written by Angelic on June 15, 2013

I’ve added new photos of Rooney Mara at the ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’ Press Conference at the Four Seasons Hotel on June 14, 2013 in Beverly Hills, California.



written by Angelic on June 04, 2013

I’ve added several new portraits of Rooney Mara and the casts of ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’ posed for ‘The Hollywood Reporter’, ‘Cannes Film Festival’, & ‘Entertainment Weekly’. They are beautifully shot.

The Hollywood Reporter

Entertainment Weekly

Cannes Film Festival

 

 



written by Angelic on May 25, 2013

I’ve added new trailer screen captures of Rooney Mara featured in her new film, Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’ to the gallery.



written by Angelic on May 25, 2013



written by Angelic on May 22, 2013

Rating: 4/5

There’s something very familiar about David Lowery’s Ain’t Them Bodies Saints. The writer-director himself might twitch few ears in recognition, after his most recent work, the largely unheralded duo of Lullaby and St. Nick, but in the bones of his latest, which played as part of Critic’s Week here, is the genetics of familiar art. There is almost certainly a major nod here to Badlands, as well as Thieves Like Us, and more generally speaking, Lowery seems intent on re-exploring the essence of that particular period of outlaw movies.

Saints begins with a shoot-out, involving Bob Muldoon (Casey Affleck) and Ruth Guthrie (Rooney Mara,) who are subsequently hauled away. Muldoon is arrested, but the pregnant Guthrie is let go, to live in a comfortable house in a small Texan town called Meridian looked after by the excellent Keith Carradine. We’re not furnished with details of the trigger event, until the narrative progresses significantly, being drip-fed tiny morsels that piece together bit by bit, with the script offering far more focus to the central relationship.

There’s certainly something of Malick in the way Lowery frames his story, which isn’t at all a bad thing, given how well the drenched visuals fit the emotional undercurrent of the film. It’s just a shame that Lowery couldn’t match his aesthetic convictions and maturity with a story-telling maturity, as his story is a little twee and there’s a jarring clash between an obviously serious agenda and sentimentality. As an art film, it still works very well, and both Mara and Affleck have enough to work with to offer strong performances, it’s just that the substance doesn’t quite marry up with the style in places.

The joy of the film is in the interplay between characters – the plot is rounded out by Ben Foster’s local cop – and the ambiguity that masks the nature of some of the key relationships, including a trio of bad guys who appear after a time as things roll inevitably towards another flashpoint, bringing just as inevitable action and tragedy. Lowery has made a Western of sorts, with lots of traditional flags, not all of which are dealt with completely successfully, I might add, but there is certainly pleasure in his poetic convictions.

It’s a shame the film wasn’t grittier – not for the want of obligatory violence, but because films like this haven’t been made since Badlands for a reason, and even the most traditional of genres evolve. But for its substance problems, the style is really a beautiful thing – Lowery is clearly enamoured with the Malick method, and his cinematographer – Bradford Young – offers a delirious and beautiful portrait of his vision.

This is certainly another of those gems hidden away in the sidebars of Cannes that deserves to be cherished by a wider audience – and thanks to the talent associated with the project, and the inevitable high profile, that will be the case.

Source: What Culture



written by Angelic on May 19, 2013

I’ve added new event photos of Rooney Mara attends the photocall of ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’ at Espace Miramar during The 66th Annual Cannes Film Festival on May 18, 2013 in Cannes, France.



written by Angelic on May 10, 2013

After seeing “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival, we said in our review that it’s “a wholly engrossing and impressive piece of work that the movie world will be talking about all year long.” Indeed, the chatter around the well-received film is likely to continue as it heads to the south of France next week to screen for international audiences and critics. And today we have some exclusive images from the movie, which is one of our 15 Most Anticipated Indie Films Of The Summer. Featuring a stellar cast including Casey Affleck, Rooney Mara, Ben Foster, Keith Carradine and Nate Parker, the story follows an outlaw who escapes from prison to reunite with his wife and the daughter he’s never met. And that’s just part of the film, which we called “a searing, romantic crime drama and love story.” As these images suggest, it’s not only a great story, but it’s beautifully lensed as well. Here’s the film’s new synopsis.

Bob Muldoon (Casey Affleck) and Ruth Guthrie (Rooney Mara), an impassioned young outlaw couple on an extended crime spree, are finally apprehended by lawmen after a shootout in the Texas hills. Although Ruth wounds a local officer, Bob takes the blame. But four years later, Bob escapes from prison and sets out to find Ruth and their daughter, born during his incarceration. Set against the backdrop of 1970’s Texas Hill Country, first time director David Lowery paints a poetic picture, evoking the mythology of westerns and saturating the dramatic space with an aching sense of loss. Featuring powerful performances by Affleck and Mara as well as Ben Foster and Keith Carradine, AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS is a story of love, motherhood and searching for peace while faced with an unrelenting past.

Produced by Toby Halbrooks, James M. Johnston, Jay Van Hoy, Lars Knudsen, Amy Kaufman and Cassian Elwes, “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” will arrive in theaters via IFC Films on August 16th. It will play as part of the Critics’ Week section at Cannes and also hits BAMcinemaFest in New York City in June.

Source: Indie Wire





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