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Rooney Attends ‘Her’ Photocall & Press Conference at 8th RFF HQ Photos

I’ve added new high quality event photos of Rooney Mara and director Spike Jonze attend the ‘Her’ Photocall & Press Conference during the 8th Rome Film Festival at the Auditorium Parco Della Musica on November 10, 2013 in Rome, Italy.

The 8th Rome Film Festival ‘Her’ Photocall – November 10

The 8th Rome Film Festival ‘Her’ Press Conference – November 10

Recent News

Rooney Mara Prefers Living In Downtown!

Rooney Mara has revealed to E! News she prefer to live downtown that she is not a fan of uptown. She also talks about how she managed pressure in Hollywood and upcoming projects.

Rooney Prefers Downtown

“I always prefer to live downtown,” she told E! News. “I feel like downtown more just stands for where the artists are. When I’m living in New York, I try never to go uptown… above 24th street.”

Ready for Hollywood Pressure

“You come out here to be judged,” Rooney confessed. “That’s sort of what it is. But you just have to try not to think about it. “I always want to feel like myself. I always want to feel comfortable. You know, if people don’t like it then that’s OK.”

On her other movie roles she is taking

“Well, I did four movies in a row. I did Side Effects. Then I did Spike’s movie [Her]. Then I did Terrence Malick’s movie [still untitled]. Then I was like, ‘Oh my God. I’m never working again,’” she said to CinemaBlend. “And that’s a long, hat was a long time to take off for me. Now, I’m working in September, but I only just now feel ready to work.”

 

Carol Recent News

Rooney Mara Joins Todd Haynes Directed Film ‘Carol’

Good news, Rooney Mara has landed a role in Todd Haynes directed new film, Carol. Mia Wasikowska was previously attached to the film but was dropped recently. The film evolves around two women from different backgrounds strike up a relationship in 1950s New York. Based on Patricia Highsmith’s book “The Price of Salt.”

Todd Haynes on Rooney Joining ‘Carol’

“We’re over the moon to have Rooney on board,” said Haynes. “I’ve been a tremendous admirer of her work from the beginning, so the thought of bringing her together with Cate on-screen is thrilling to say the least.”

Added Karlsen: “Rooney Mara is one of the most interesting and striking young talents working today. There are few actors who have the weight to play against someone with the extraordinary distinction and mercurial range of Cate Blanchett, and she is one of them. The combination of them both is something potentially sensational.”

Interviews Photo Gallery Photoshoots

New York Times Interviews Rooney Mara

Rooney Mara is not known for giving off the warmest of first impressions. Standoffish, aloof, icy, remote, guarded, distant, opaque, steely, impenetrable, unreadable: such tend to be the words used by journalists to describe their encounters with the actress, a less than inviting list of adjectives that I decide to lob at her the moment we meet in Manhattan. I figure my little ignoble stunt will put Mara on the defensive, stir up some deep-seated insecurities, maybe even provoke a flash of anger, all in the name of exposing some new, hidden dimension of the actress to the world.

“Yeah,” Mara says when I finish. “I kind of have a bad reputation, don’t I?”

Her tone is so unruffled that she may as well be remarking on the weather in a city she doesn’t care to visit. And from there? Silence. Mara fixes me with the same unblinking, glacier-eyed stare she deploys so penetratingly on screen — most notably in her breakout role, as the cyberpunk Lisbeth Salander, in David Fincher’s 2011 adaptation of “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.” Finally, sensing victory in my discomfort, a sly grin springs up on Mara’s elfin, alabaster face.

“Isn’t mystique and the unknown,” she asks, “part of what keeps you drawn to someone?”